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Belgium


Map of Belgium

The Kingdom of Belgium

World Convention is currently building a global reference for the  countries and territories where we know there are Christian – Churches of Christ – Disciples of Christ Congregations. Of the 193 United Nations States, the Stone-Campbell Movement exists in 165. This listing includes other nations and territories, numbering 194 countries where there is at least one representation of our churches.

Rather than waiting for comprehensive, complete information we are putting up the details we have available. If you can correct or add to this information, please contact the World Convention Office with details at gary@worldconvention.org.

Background

The Kingdom of Belgium is a federal constitutional monarchy with two legislative bodies, the Senate and the Chamber of Deputies. The monarchs are King Albert II and Queen Paola. Belgium is a small, densely populated country on the North Sea bounded by France, Germany and the Netherlands. For more than 2,000 years the area was dominated by a succession of foreign powers. In 1830 the Belgians declared their independence and installed Leopold I as King. The country’s population is divided into two main groups, the Flemings are the larger group and live mostly in the north and speak Dutch. The south is inhabited by the French-speaking Walloons.

Religion

75% Roman Catholic and 25% Protestant.

Stone-Campbell Presence

A strong presence of American a cappella Churches of Christ began in about 1947 when S. F. Timmerman planted a French-speaking congregation in Brugge, which later moved to Verviers. Since 1970 this congregation has been served by Belgian Jean-Marie Frerot. From 1965-1970 a Bible training school also existed here, under the leadership of Don Taylor. Other congregations were planted in Liege (1951), Charleroi (early 1960s), suburban Brussels (1953) which moved to Mons in the 1970s. Other congregations have also been established in Brussels. Both English and French services are conducted in Brussels.

In the Flemish north Roy Davison began working in Oostende in 1961 and Roeselare in about 1966. Other congregations were formed in Brugge, Merksem, and Leuven. Among the evangelistic methods employed in Belgium have been the Let’s Start Talking project, distribution of literature, and the use of Canadian students and two-year apprenticeship programs. In about 1980 Belgian Arnold Huyghebaert returned to Belgium to minister after studying in America. A number of other American missionaries have served in Belgium under the sponsorship of several American congregations. A correspondence school, Ecole du Maitre (School of the Master), is also providing leadership training for future generations.

Henki and Mary E. Boonaerts work with the Belgium for Christ Mission in Opglabbeek. The Boonaerts are supported by the American Christian Churches and Churches of Christ. A Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) presence has been felt in the American Protestant Church in Antwerp through Disciples minister Walter Taylor.

International Churches of Christ have a congregation in Brussels.

Clinton J. Holloway
National Profiles Editor
October 2003

Revised by Gary Holloway, January 15, 2014

Contact Information

A. National Office
B. Congregational Information

Web site: http://www.churches-of-christ.net/world/europe.html

C. Educational Institutions

Ecole du Maitre

D. Social Service Ministries
E. Magazines/Periodicals
F. International Ministries
G. Conventions/Lectureships/Assemblies/Forums/Conferences
H. Points of Interest